GE Refrigerator with Keurig Levels Up Your Mornings

Single-serve coffee brewers have been steaming up the coffee industry quite some time. So many coffee lovers now enjoy the convenient pick-me-up afforded by the Buick of a coffeemaker parked in a space formerly reserved for kitchen prep.

According to a 2018 National Coffee Association coffee drinking trends survey, 41 percent of respondents who drank coffee said they used a single-cup brewer.

But how convenient can a Keurig be when you still have the same amount of steps?

  1. Add coffee
  2. Add water
  3. Brew

Until now…

GE Refrigerators with Built-in Keurig Brewing System

Brewing System 1

Single cups of coffee got a lot more convenient. IT’S PLUMBED, PEOPLE! Inserting a K-Cup becomes the only step of your morning coffee routine, as the refrigerator’s coffee dispenser supplies fresh, filtered water for every cup with no need to refill. One-step coffee. Game-changer.

Better yet, using your refrigerator as your coffeemaker means you can reclaim your coveted counter space.

Perhaps for this?

Perhaps for this.

Or this.

 

dogtreatmaker

The partnership evolved from the GE Café French-door refrigerator with a hot water dispenser (also cool for tea drinkers or baby bottle preparers) after current owners saw coffee brewing as the refrigerator’s natural progression and suggested it to GE.

If you want to talk about really fancy, your mobile device connects to the fridge so you can preset your brew time so the water in the reservoir heats up in anticipation of your groggy self impatiently pushing the button the next morning.

Genius.

Side note: Miele began selling a built-in coffee system years ago that had the ability to work with coffee pods.

Do you like single-serve coffeemakers, or are you a full pot kind of person? Let us know in the comments!

No. 1 Cause of Appliance Returns

So you’ve fallen in love with a new appliance, and it looks great and has the features to do all the stuff you want it do.

And you plunk down a sizable chunk of change (appliances are no small expenditure!), and schedule the delivery.

So imagine your sadness when the only thing our highly complimented, professional crew delivers is the bad news that your beautiful new appliance won’t

  • fit through your doors
  • into your allotted space
  • work with your existing connections

This isn’t a rare occurrence that only happens to those with irregular house situations; It happens ALL the time because all houses are irregular.

Heck, my new refrigerator nearly didn’t fit because the width changed between the upper cabinet and lower cabinet, and I had only measured the latter! (Luckily, our guys are pros and made it work for me.)

Also, consider the space needed to use the appliance. For instance, is there enough room for the door to open? Not only was my space almost too narrow for the top of my fridge, but in switching from a top-mount refrigerator to a freezer-on-the-bottom model, I failed to consider that the freezer drawer would need to clear the window frame along its left side only a couple inches ahead. Again, our guys are pros and made my selection work despite all its challenges.

If you’re purchasing laundry, consider which side your washer and dryer are on and make sure that the doors will open appropriately.

Ideally, the machine on the left should have hinges on the left side of its doors and the machine on the right should have its hinges on the right side of the door.

Bottom line: Assuming you need “standard”-sized appliances is dangerous because standard doesn’t exist. And every house is different.

If you’re considering replacing any of your appliances soon, this checklist will help you prevent the expensive and time-consuming mistake of purchasing the wrong product for your space.

Our salespeople will qualify you, but as in the case of my refrigerator, even I didn’t measure diligently enough!

Measure the opening

Measure the area where your appliance will be placed rather than the size of your existing appliance. And take it from me and measure along several spots of your opening.

Size up the pathway

Those living in older homes especially, take note! Ensure that your appliance it will fit through each hallway and doorway of the entire path to its final destination.

Of course, you can remove railings and doors if necessary, but you’ll want to do this in advance and remeasure to ensure that this too allows enough space. When in doubt, discuss the situation with your sales rep.

Check your connections

You need the appropriate electric outlet within 3-½ feet of the space you’ve selected for your new product. Make sure the outlet is grounded (accepts a three-prong plug), since most appliances require one. For electric dryers and electric ranges, be sure to check for a 240V electric connection.

Measure twice, cut once

Take another look at the pathway en route to the final destination of your appliance and ensure that your product will fit through the designated space.

It could save you more than 25% of the purchase price, your valuable time and (if you’re like me) your ego.
>>See our complete list of tips for buying appliances and having them delivered

5 Food Preservation Tips

With the opening of farmers markets and the start of many people’s CSA shares, the perennial topic of food storage becomes fresh again. Check out these 5 tips to keep your food fresh longer.

1. Use your crisper

Those clear drawers in your fridge aren’t just for convenience. Many models allow you adjust the humidity of your crisper drawers to suit their contents. Consult your use & care manual for specifics on your model, but in general, set humidity to high for green, leafy vegetables and low for fruits and vegetables with skins.

2. Pick your spot

Brands might create the perfect space for gallon-jug storage on your refrigerator door, but consider how quickly you will use highly perishable foods before storing them here. Why? Consider the temperature fluctuations of this region of the refrigerator.

If you go through a gallon of milk every couple days, then maybe it doesn’t matter. But those of use who just use a sprinkle in our coffee should definitely select a cooler spot, like the back of the fridge, which is less affected when the door opens.

Accordingly, produce like broccoli, asparagus and apples benefit from colder temperatures located near the rear. Corn and berries benefit from the warmest spot in the refrigerator, so choose those for the front.

3. Use a paper towel to keep your greens green

Greens (especially leftovers) quickly become yellows and browns.

Arrange washed greens between paper towels to absorb excess moisture and seal them in punctured plastic bags.

4. Don’t pass gas

Ethylene gas, that is. Foods like apples, peaches and pears produce ethylene, a gas that kick-starts ripening, which can cause premature aging in some fruits and damage in others. Avoid storing ethylene-producing foods near others sensitive to it, or keep them in a plastic bag to contain the gas.

5. Know what NOT to refrigerate

Sometimes the refrigerator can do more harm than good – as in the case of avocados, bananas, tomatoes, pineapples, mangoes, potatoes and squash – which should be stored at room temperature. Cold temperatures can dehydrate and damage these foods.

What are your best food preservation tips? Share them in the comments!

Energy Star refrigerators save $50/year over 1990s fridges

This is an outdated picture of my kitchen, but you get the idea.

I’m replacing my 15-year-old refrigerator this month with a more roomy, smarter-designed and better-looking new fridge.

Best of all, it’s an Energy Star refrigerator, which means that it uses at least 20 percent less energy than a non-Energy Star fridge. Plus, although Energy Star refrigerators generally cost more upfront, you should consider overall cost of the appliance — which includes how much energy it uses compared to other models.

Energy Star estimates that over the lifetime of your refrigerator, you will cut your energy bills by $165 versus if you used an non-Energy Star model.

So think of how much you save when you unplug the refrigerator you’re using right now? Actually, see the handy chart below.

So my fridge from the ’90s costs about $97 per year compared to an Energy Star refrigerator, which uses an average of $48, according to this chart. (And actually, my new fridge is 10 percent better than the Energy Star standards; its energy use is estimated to cost about $43 per year.)

Obviously, I have to buy the new fridge, but I’ve budgeted for that. Now, what will I do with the $50? Better question: what will do with the $600 in usage cost savings I’ll realize over the average life (12 years) of my refrigerator?

Tips for National Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day

As you make more frequent trips to the grocery store to stock up on all the fixings for your Thanksgiving dinner, your refrigerator becomes fuller and fuller. Then your new bounty pushes your leftovers (which let’s face it, are meat surprise by now) farther to the back of the fridge. And before you know it, the holiday is over, and your fridge is overflowing with leftover turkey and casseroles.

Sound familiar? We thought so, which is why the timing couldn’t be better for National Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day. Set your refrigerator up for success this holiday season with these tips.

Refrigerator Cleaning

  1. Empty the contents of your refrigerator, checking for expiration dates as you go. Throw away or compost any expired foods, and place the rest in a cooler while you work. Can’t find an expiration date? When in doubt, throw it out!
  2. Unplug the refrigerator so you don’t waste energy as you work. Use a gentle cleaner to wipe down shelves, doors and drawers. Warm, soapy water usually does the trick. GE recommends 1 to 2 tablespoons of baking soda to a quart of water.
  3. Rinse away any residue with warm water. Then, dry the refrigerator with a gentle cloth.

Refrigerator Organizing

Now it’s time to put all the food back in the refrigerator. If you don’t organize your refrigerator contents often, take this opportunity to put everything back in a way that makes sense. Low-humidity drawers are ideal for fruit, while higher humidity works best for vegetables. Store meats in the back.

Keep leftovers front and center of the refrigerator so you remember to eat them before they spoil. You might even consider labeling leftovers with the date in which they were prepared. Be honest with yourself. If you aren’t going to eat the leftover lasagna, get rid of it.

stack of food leftovers

Wipe down condiment bottles to remove spills and drips before returning them to the refrigerator.

Plastic bins provide a clever way to organize fridge contents and cut down on clutter. Or invest in a Lazy Susan to prevent losing bottles and jars in the back of your fridge.

Once your refrigerator is cleaned and organized, you’re one step ahead in your holiday prep. Isn’t that cool?

Photo credit: GE Appliances

What are your best tips for a clean and organized refrigerator? Share them in the comments below!