Posts Tagged ‘GE’

GE Cafe range: pro-style range at home cook price

August 8, 2011

I visited this summer with a homeowner on the upcoming AIA Homes By Architects Tour who loved to cook. Wolf Range makes the go-to cook’s range, but she hated the way it looked.

She loved the look of the GE Cafe dual fuel range, which also happens to be quite a bit more affordable, at $2799. It’s worth taking a look at, due to its professional styling and features:

  • Dual fuel means  combines the precise temperature control of gas on the stove top and even heating of electric in the oven
  • Convection system promises even air and heat circulation, plus it converts temperatures for you automatically.
  • Super big (5 cubic foot) oven cavity with meat probe, ideal for large roasts and — since it has convection — multiple racks of dishes
  • PowerBoil 18,000 BTU gas burner means water boils really quick, plus high heat for more professional-style cooking

Kitchen appliance packages quickly update the style and function of your space

July 11, 2011

Buying in bulk to save money doesn’t just apply to food and household goods. If you’re looking for cheap appliances, kitchen appliance packages offer some of the best prices available.

Plus, new appliances mean your kitchen immediately becomes better looking and harder working. If only we offered the same deal for your significant other :)

Here are some examples of appliances packages, from entry level, to high end. Keep in mind that any group of appliances can be “packaged,” but the ones shown online are some of our most popular combinations.

Through July 20, you can buy this Frigidaire kitchen appliance set for as low as $1,299 in white, black or bisque.This kitchen appliance package comes with a 18 cu. ft. top-freezer refrigerator, a 30″ freestanding range – gas or electric, an over the range microwave and built-in dishwasher!

Or, get this stainless steel kitchen appliance package for $1,999.

Have your eye on a French door refrigerator? Get one in this GE stainless steel kitchen package along with the rest of your kitchen for $2,899 through July 20.

People rave about their Bosch dishwashers, but this Bosch kitchen set is just downright pretty. Get it for a song at $4,099 till July 31.

>> See all kitchen appliance packages

When to break up with your refrigerator

June 17, 2011

The average refrigerator lasts about 12 years, but what if yours is still humming along?

A week ago, we got an email from the sweetest lady EVER (don’t even try to debate it). It began:

My husband purchased a General Electric refrigerator on May 20, 1949, 6 days after our brand new daughter, Mary, was born.  One of the features I liked about it was a “butter conditioner”.

This Model MF8F General Electric refrigerator is still running.  But there is the possibility, it could seize to function one day.

The ‘butter conditioner’ in the door is intended to keep butter at the temperature I desire.

Thus far, I don’t know where to look for a refrigerator with this feature.  I’m almost sure you can help me.

Clearly, this woman — bless her heart — should’ve replaced her refrigerator decades ago. That wolf-in-sheep’s-clothing butter conditioner, though source of such creamy deliciousness, really is just a black hole of energy.

That thing probably runs on $300-$400 worth of electricity per year, versus $50 or so of a new Energy Star refrigerator.

I’m not hating on this woman (on the contrary; I want to adopt her), as it’s hard to tell when to just break up with a “perfectly good” refrigerator.

The New York Times mused on the topic in 2008, and decided that 15-years-old is a pretty safe retirement age for your refrigerator.

What if you inherited appliances from the previous owner? If you’re like me and your home was sold to you with so-called updated appliances, you can use Energy Star’s Refrigerator Retirement Savings Calculator, a handy tool that lets you input the model number of your current fridge to see how much more you’re spending on energy use annually versus a new, Energy Star refrigerator.

Refrigerator moving advice

October 20, 2010

Here’s a true Frequently Asked Question, pulled from the “I used to answer phones at the store” file.

I’ve fielded many calls inquiring if it’s OK to put a refrigerator on its side when moving it. Certainly, the manufacturers don’t recommend it. But sometimes it’s necessary, right?

So, when you can’t transport your fridge upright, GE suggests laying your top-freezer refrigerator or bottom-freezer refrigerator on the side opposite the hinges, so the door will remain closed. If you have a side-by-side fridge, place it freezer-side down (that door is less likely to come open).

When you bring the fridge inside its new home, keep it unplugged and upright for the same amount of time it spent on its side. If the refrigerator spend more than a day on its side, let it stand for 24 hours before plugging it in.

Also, GE suggests wheeling the refrigerator on its side when using a dolly to avoid damage to the front or rear of the unit.

And please, remove all the racks and cover your beautiful Warners’ Stellian refrigerator with a moving blanket. We love appliances too much so see you damage them on accident.

5 Energy Star washers that almost pay for themselves

September 24, 2010

Appliances aren’t cheap. And Energy Star appliances cost even more than standard, new appliances.

But that’s just the sticker price. I’ve blogged before about how the long-term savings of Energy Star washers will not only end up costing less than regular washers in the end, they’ll pay for a dryer.

An Energy Star washer costs an average of $258 more at purchase time, but saves about $481 in energy and water costs over its lifetime.

Now, unless you get it at heavy discount or as part of a government stimulus/utility rebate program, $481 won’t pay for an Energy Star washer. But it comes close.

Here’s a roundup of the least-expensive Energy Star washing machines to prove that energy efficient appliances can be accessible to all.

GE 4.1 Cu. Ft. Energy Star Washer (EWA5600KWW)

Frigidaire Front-Load Washer (FTF530FS)

Maytag 4.0 cu. ft. Energy Star Washer (MVWC6ESWW)

Whirlpool 4.3 Cu. Ft Energy Star Washer (WTW5500XW)

MY PICK: Fisher & Paykel EcoSmart 4.2 cu.ft washer (WA42T26GW1)

Stoves with double ovens: Hot trend

September 22, 2010

(pun intended in that one)

With the official start of hot dish season Thursday, the migration of cooks inside from their grills to their ranges commences.

At least that’s what I’m cooking. Sure, a couple times a year, we clear out the racks to accommodate a turkey and ham. Or you might be a bread-baker. (I’m more of a meatloaf-maker, myself.)

But I’d venture that most of you most the time need the height of just one rack.

So why do you need to use such a big oven all time? You don’t, which is we’re seeing more kitchens with double oven ranges and more brands making them. Using the smaller oven means you preheat faster, use less energy and, best of all, don’t have to bend down so far to put in/pull out your pans.

Here’s a roundup:

Maytag Gemini Gas Double Oven Range

Jenn-Air Dual Fuel Double Oven Convection Range

Jenn-Air Electric Double Oven Range

Frigidaire Gallery Gas Double Oven Range FGGF304DLF

Whirlpool Gas Double Oven Range GGG388LXS

GE Electric Double Oven Range JB850SPSS

What’s your favorite finish? White, black or stainless steel?

June 23, 2010

I really like the contrast of the white appliances against the black cabinets here. And it surprises, because we now expect stainless steel. Image courtesy theletteredcottage.net

Appliances historically have been white, but how do you feel about colors like black or alternative finishes like stainless steel?

Tradition makes white classic, but it also makes anything different stand out all the more in a kitchen.

Trendy right now are stainless steel appliances, which followed the popularity of commercial-style ranges and cooking appliances that were always made of stainless steel. Their clean modern looks makes it hard to argue against their popularity.

houzz.com

But stainless steel appliances usually cost more, and in some cases a great deal more (though right now through Aug. 1, GE is offering a free upgrade to stainless steel from white and black).

I think when I replace my appliances, I’ll probably choose stainless steel because my sense tells me it will add to the resale value of my home, which I don’t plan to live in for more than seven years.

Plus, it’s hard to match commercial cooking products to colored finishes, leaving me to lean toward the even more expensive integrated (or paneled) looks.

What do you have now: black, white or stainless steel? What will you replace it with when the time comes and why?


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 83 other followers