Posts Tagged ‘Edina’

Meet DIY Network’s ‘Rehab Addict’ this Wednesday

February 21, 2011

Nicole Curtis works on the Lyndale House during this season of DIY Network's "Rehab Addict."

Don’t be fooled by her frame.

She might be petite, but star of DIY Network’s “Rehab Addict” Nicole Curtis shows old homes who’s boss.

Read more about the local Realtor, investor and single mom in this Sunday’s Star Tribune article ‘A Jill of all trades.

This season, Nicole Curtis takes a 1916 Arts and Crafts-style home in the Tangletown neighborhood of Minneapolis from unlivable to unbelievable (trust me, I’ve walked through it).

And this Wednesday, Feb. 23 at Warners’ Stellian Edina (across from the Galleria), she’ll use her experience fixing and selling home to teach you the best ways you can improve the resale value of your own home. The event begins at 5:30 p.m.

After her presentation, you can meet Nicole and ask your own questions. We’ll also see scenes from the next week’s episode, which features Nicole appliance shopping at Warners’ Stellian.

Plus, eat well with Hors d’œuvres from D’Amico & Sons and of course, drinks too.

We’re so excited, and it’s free, so we hope you can join us!

HOW TO: ace the Spaces portfolio review

July 9, 2010

Spaces magazine asked us to host the local shelter publication’s kitchen and bath portfolio review on July 22 at our Warners’ Stellian Edina showroom.

Editor Heidi Raschke and Art Director Ellen Thomson will give designers three minutes to present a project or two, which will hopefully lead to a future feature! To help you best prepare for the review, I asked Heidi and Ellen to offer some advice, which follows below. For more information on the event and to RSVP, visit our events calendar. Good luck!

1. We’re looking for a variety of projects, and we’re looking for good stories. Sometimes a project itself is so innovative or grand or dazzling that it’s strong enough for a story. Sometimes the story behind the project makes it interesting. Sometimes it’s a combination of both. If you’re excited about it, we probably will be interested, too.

2. You only have three minutes to meet us and tell us about your work, so come prepared with a focused presentation. Show us one or two projects that you’re really proud of or that is indicative of your style rather than a smattering. Leave us printouts or discs with photos as well as your contact information and any other information you’d like to share about the project or projects.

3. If you have projects that have already been professionally photographed, that’s a huge plus. Not a requirement, but a plus.

Ellen Thomson (back) and Heidi Raschke (front)

4. If you know the homeowner will talk to us, that also is a plus. We prefer to have homeowners on the record.

5. Don’t be intimidated. The time limits are necessary, but try to relax. You’re helping us get smarter and do our jobs better, and we appreciate the help. Portfolio reviews are fun for us. We really enjoy getting out of the office, putting faces with names and seeing your work.

6. If you have questions in advance, feel free to e-mail Heidi Raschke at hraschke@pioneerpress.com or Ellen Thomson at ellenmthomson@pioneerpress.com.

Hope to see you there,
Heidi Raschke and Ellen Thomson

Epic battle: Gas grills vs. charcoal grills

April 9, 2010

At the risk of being controversial, I’ll just say it: grilling is grilling — no matter what fuel source you use.

Both involve the radiant transfer of heat from the fuel source to the food resting on a cooking grid. Drippings come off of the food, land on the heat source and sizzle and smoke. The smoke rising into your food creates barbecue flavor.

So, really, it just depends on what you like.

I like quick, convenient and fool-proof. So I like gas grilling.

Gas grills offer more control over temperature and often have options for high-temperature searing and low-temperature, indirect cooking. Many gas grills have small shrouds that shield the burners from incoming drippings to minimize flare-ups and control temperatures.

See? It’s convenient, and it’s quick. So gas grilling gets my personal vote. (Please feel free to battle me in the comments.)

But grilling purists swear charcoal’s the only way to roll (nice rhyme, eh?). The smoky, barbecue flavor created by the drippings sizzling and smoking off the charcoal can’t happen in a gas grill, they say.

And they are more simple in their essence. Charcoal grills lack the mechanical sophistication (i.e. stuff that breaks) of gas grills, such as burners, shields and igniters. They require only charcoal, meaning no mid-party trips to the store for another propane tank.

And did I mention the flavor? Apparently, charcoal grills lend a distinct flavor to their foods — especially meats.

I’m going to check out this weekend’s BBQ Expo at our Edina store (across from the Galleria) Saturday. Maybe I’ll be convinced that charcoal is doable. Maybe I’ll just eat.

We’ll be having live grilling demos 10-4 Saturday and 12-4 Sunday at all of our 7 Warners’ Stellian store locations. All grills (except UMRP, like Wolf) are on sale starting Saturday. And we’ll assemble it, deliver it and take an old one if you have it for free with purchase of a grill $499 and up.

You’ll get $50 to Von Hanson’s Meats if you buy a grill priced $599 and higher. Von Hanson’s is this cool, old-fashioned meat market with expert cuts of the best quality meats. And it’s local joint, so you know I love ‘em already.

My friend Stu “King of the Barbecue” (he’ll stop feeding me if I don’t add that part) Glock says most expo-goers already have their mind made up on their fuel preference. But he also says, “You have two cars, why not two grills?” He advocates for a workhorse Holland Grill gas grill and a charcoal grill, maybe a Big Green Egg smoker grill, for when you really have some time to spend outdoors.

So comment away: I’d love to hear about why others like gas grills and I suppose I’d entertain some hating from barbecue purists as well ;)


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